Philly drummer Bruce Klauber and the art of ring-a-ding and swing a la Buddy Rich

For both a step to the past and to the present, Bruce Klauber will make himself part of The Monday Blues/Jazz Orchestra under the direction of Jerry Zucker to perform the music of Buddy Rich and Friends at Chris’ Jazz Cafe’ on Wednesday, February 19th.

To know Philadelphia drummer, singer, journalist, video producer, and all-around mensch Bruce Klauber is to appreciate the art of everything ring-a-ding-ding.

Klauber – who I have written about extensively in regard to his All-Star Jazz Trio with Andy Kahn, Bruce Kaminsky and occasional vocalist Peggy King or his role as tech adviser to the Oscar-winning drum drama Whiplash – certainly dwells in the moment. He sings Sinatra songs at D’Angelo’s every Tuesday, plays every Wednesday at Square on Square, acts as a publicist for pal, cabaret vocalist Eddie Bruce.

Bruce Klauber sings Sinatra.

But, the past of the entertainment world when the Rat Pack reigned, when the Latin Casino was in full swing, when drum god Buddy Rich was his big band/jazz prime, when men were men goes the saying – that’s Klauber’s sweet spot.

Klauber has already acted as a biographer of drummers such as Rich and Gene Krupa in book and video form, co-edited Swedish writer Pelle Berglund’s “Buddy Rich One of a Kind,” as well as translated portion (so Klauber speaks a North Germanic language, too?) and helped facilitate its acquisition for worldwide publication via Hudson Music and the Hal Leonard Corp.

For both a step to the past and to the present, Klauber will make himself part of The Monday Blues/Jazz Orchestra under the direction of Jerry Zucker to perform the music of Buddy Rich and Friends at Chris’ Jazz Cafe’ on Wednesday, February 19 to celebrate the publication of “Buddy Rich One of a Kind: The Making of The World’s Greatest Drummer” at Chris’ Jazz Café at 7 and 9 p.m.

Klauber’s main goal in the colorfully exploratory and voluminous “One of a Kind” was to help tell the jazz world that Krupa’s art form was far more sensitive and nuanced than the raging explosions that took place on the skins and the bandstand, as opposed to the backstage Rich was better known for; dressing down band members for not being sharp, angry at players for not respecting the muse.

Bruce Klauber will always respect the muse. Ring-a-ding that.


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